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The Audio Museum

Rev. Al and The Pythons

Once again The Audio Museum is proud to announce a new old band. New to me but not to the music scene around Lubbock Texas and surrounding areas. I am so happy to have had the chance to see these guys since the guitar player is an old friend of mine that I haven’t seen in about 20 yrs or so. I am so thankful to his wife Mindy for reaching out and contacting me and giving me the opportunity to see him again.

I first got to know Tony Adams back in the early 90’s when he was playing with Robbin Griffin and fell in love with his sound and style immediately. He tends to fly under the music radar by never really putting his name “out there” but he’s played with some of the greats through out his years and tenure. He is one of the best lead and slide guitarists that you will ever see or hear.

As the night went on I kept thinking I knew the drummer somehow, he just looked familiar to me. Later Tony said he was the same drummer The Robbin Griffin Band! I knew he looked familiar. I have to say I was pleasantly surprised with Reverend Al and The Pythons. The Rev. is a great lead man and plays a mean bass and props to the keyboard player who I only spoke briefly with, this guy is amazing and can sing! Can’t wait to these guys again.

What a great group of talented musicians: Al Warner, Terry Vincent, Jaime Moreno, Tony Adams

Enjoy

No.11 TAM’s Top 15 Best Blues Songs of All Time

 

Hello and Welcome Back!

I took a break from the blues countdown on the fact that I was moving. Oh what a nightmare, I hate moving. But I’m back and ready to get the show on the road!

Ok you knew this one was coming, it has been around forever and simply put is one of the greats. I really think I would be amiss if it wasn’t in here somewhere. We can all debate the order of every list we’ve ever seen and heard but content is still king, at least till we get to the top five. But for now I’m happy to just be on the river!

Wiki:

Travelling Riverside Blues,” sometimes called “Mudbone” or “Mud Bone,” is a blues song written and recorded in Dallas, Texas by the bluesman Robert Johnson. Johnson’s June 20, 1937 recording has a typical 12 bar blues structure (though as is common in downhome blues of this era, the length of each verse is in fact thirteen-and-a-half bars of 4/4), played on a single guitar tuned to open G, with a slide. It was first released on the 1961 compilation LP King of the Delta Blues Singers.

  • This was written and originally recorded by Blues great Robert Johnson. Led Zeppelin borrowed heavily from American Blues music.
  • Led Zeppelin first played this for a BBC session in 1969, but the song was never released on an album. It was placed on the Box Set in 1990, and it was also made a bonus track on the Coda album for the Complete Studio Recordings.
  • Jimmy Page used a 12-string acoustic guitar to play this song.
  • The lyric, “I’ve had no lovin’ since my baby been gone” came from B.B. King’s “Woke Up This Morning (My Baby Was Gone).”
  • To get the fast bass beats, John Bonham used “Triplets” on the bass drum – he would use the tip of his toe.
    ~ This information is found here.
~ Robert Johnson – Traveling Riverside Blues
~ Led Zeppelin- Traveling Riverside Blues

N0.12 TAM’s Top 15 Best Blues Songs of All Time

Hello and welcome!

We are down to number 12 from only 15 and it’s already been a long blues filled ride. This song has some serious history behind it and has been remade over and over. I’ve always been intrigued by this story and like all great songs it’s ability to pull the listener in and keep you captivated. I concede that Zeppelin’s version (as good and polished as it is) isn’t exactly the epitome of blues per se which is why in this case I actually lean toward Leadbelly’s version.

N0. 12 Gallows Pole

Wiki:

The song may have originated in continental Europe. Some 50 versions have been reported in Finland, where it is well known as “Lunastettava neito“. It is titled “Den Bortsålda” in Sweden (“Die Losgekaufte” in German). A Lithuanian version has the maid asking relatives to ransom her with their best animals or belongings (crown, house, crown, ring, sword, etc.). The maiden curses her relatives who refuse to give up their property and blesses her fiancé, who does ransom her.

~Leadbelly

lead belly gallows pole

Legendary folksinger Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter, who also popularized such songs as “Cotton Fields” and “Midnight Special”, first recorded “The Gallis Pole” in the 1930’s. His haunting, shrill tenor delivers the lyrical counterpoint, and his story is punctuated with spoken-word, as he “interrupts his song to discourse on its theme”.

~ Led Zeppelin – Gallows Pole

wiki:

This is based on an old Blues song called “Gallis Pole,” which was popularized by Leadbelly. The song is considered “Traditional,” meaning the author is unknown. Jimmy Page got the idea for this after hearing the version by the California folk singer Fred Gerlach. Page explained when previewing the song for Melody Maker: “He was one of the first white people on Folkways records to get involved in Leadbelly. We have completely rearranged it and changed the verse. Robert wrote a set of new lyrics. That’s John Paul Jones on mandolin and bass, and I’m playing the banjo, six-string acoustic, 12-string and electric guitar. The bloke swinging on the gallows pole is saying wait for his relatives to arrive. The drumming builds nicely.”

No.13 – TAM’s Top 15 Best Blues Songs of All Time

Here we go again and it’s time to do the do!

Today we’re putting down a little number that comes from a band with a very long history. The track itself is from their last studio album made in 2003 so interestingly enough it throws the listener off because it sounds like it was made and written over fifty years ago, but isn’t .
To my knowledge it is the only song performed by the two newest members of the band which makes it the first and only song in the bands 30-40 year history to not have an original band member in it at all.
This song has it all…carrying a lot of heart and soul mixed in with some down and dirty, it snuggles up close to you and soon you too will have a new Old Friend.

No. 13 – Old Friend

~The Alllman Brothers Band

the-allman-brothers-band-by-maria-ives

Wiki:

Hittin’ the Note is the twelfth and final studio album by the American Southern rock group the Allman Brothers Band. Released through Sanctuary Records, it was their first studio album to include lead slide guitar player Derek Trucks and bass player Oteil Burbridge and marked the full-time return of guitar player Warren Haynes to the band. It was also their first (and only) studio album not to include original guitarist Dickey Betts. More here.

You know hard time is just an old friend, just an old friend to me
I say hard time is just an old friend, just an old friend to me
Tell me now, old friend, when you gonna let me be?

Can’t you feel a cold wind howlin’ down, blowin’ my song
Can’t you feel a cold wind howlin’ down, blowin’ my song
Well, I ain’t an old man, but you know my time ain’t long

Gonna be a hard rain – you can hear it in the distance, sounds so near
Gonna be a hard rain – you can hear it in the distance, sounds so near
People, when the rain comes, it’s gonna wash us all away from here

Mean old woman, people won’t you tell me where can she be
Mean old woman, people won’t you tell me where can she be
She’s the only woman that ever meant a damn to me

You know hard time is just an old friend, just an old friend to me
I say hard time is just an old friend, just an old friend to me
Tell me now, old friend, when you gonna let me be?
Tell me now, old friend, when you gonna let me be?
Tell me now, old friend, when you gonna let this poor man be?

No. 14 – TAM’s Top 15 Best Blues Songs of All Time

I’ve tried to not just list songs but also give a little history about them when I could. Some of my favorites are not necessarily performed by the original artists.

I  hope you find and gain a new passion for listening to the roots of the blues through The Audio Museum’s Top 15 Best Blues Songs of All Time as much or more than hearing  the newer polished material that we experience today. Either way when it’s good, it’s good. And that will never change.

 

Alright alright alright! We have a winner coming in at number fourteen. Hitting it big and old school here at The Audio Museum is a little gem written by Booker T. Washington (Bukka White)  sometime between 1930-1940. It was brought back to life in 1995 by an outstanding young guitarist named Kenny Wayne Shepherd who shortened it’s name and simply called it…Aberdeen.

14. Aberdeen Mississippi Blues

~ Booker T. White

Bukka

Wiki:

Booker T. Washington “Bukka” White (November 12, 1909 – February 26, 1977) was an American Delta blues guitarist and singer. “Bukka” is a phonetic spelling of White’s first name, though he preferred “Booker.”

Born south of Houston, Mississippi, White was a first cousin of B.B. King’s mother (White’s mother and King’s grandmother were sisters). White himself is remembered as a player of National resonator guitars. He also played, but was less adept at, the piano.

For more about Booker T. go here.

 

 ~ Kenny Wayne Shepherd – Aberdeen

kws

 

Wiki:

Shepherd was born in Shreveport, Louisiana. He graduated Caddo Magnet High School in Shreveport. The guitarist is “completely self-taught”, and does not read music. Growing up, Shepherd’s father (Ken Shepherd) was a local radio personality and some-time concert promoter, and had a vast collection of music. Shepherd got his first “guitar” at the age of three or four, when his grandmother purchased a series of several plastic guitars for him with S&H Green Stamps, which Shepherd has said he would “go through like candy”.

I highly recommend reading more about KWS here.

 

~Lyrics

I was over in Aberdeen
On my way to New Orlean
I was over in Aberdeen
On my way to New Orlean
Them Aberdeen women told me
Will buy my gasoline

Hey, two little women
That I ain’t ever seen
They has two little women
That I ain’t never seen
These two little women
Just from New Orlean

Ooh, sittin’ down in Aberdeen
With New Orlean on my mind
I’m sittin’ down in Aberdeen
With New Orlean on my mind
Well, I believe them Aberdeen women
Gonna make me lose my mind, yeah

(slide guitar & washboard)

Aber-deen is my home
But the mens don’t want me around
Aberdeen is my home
But the men don’t want me around
They know I will take these women
An take them outta town

Listen, you Aberdeen women
You know I ain’t got no dime
Oh-oh listen you women
You know’d I ain’t got no dime
They been had the po’ boy
All up and down.

The Audio Museum’s Top 15 Best Blues Songs of All Time – No. 15

I’ve tried to not just list songs but also give a little history about them when I could. Some of my favorites are not necessarily performed by the original artists.

I  hope you find and gain a new passion for listening to the roots of the blues through The Audio Museum’s Top 15 Best Blues Songs of All Time as much or more than hearing  the newer polished material that we experience today. Either way when it’s good, it’s good. And that will never change.

Enjoy!

Coming in at number fifteen is a relative newcomer to the game but don’t let that fool you. He’s steeped in “old timey” and in this writer’s opinion is a breath of fresh air in today’s musical airwaves. Based out of Brown County Indiana Reverend Peyton has brought back a style of finger picking that was almost long and forgotten due to it’s complex nature.  Big sound coming from this amazing three piece band that includes the Reverend on vocals (love his voice!) and guitar and his wife Breezy on the washboard. They recently, to this post, put out a new album only a few months ago called So Delicious. Do yourself a favor and check out The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band. Also check out the drummers floor tom in this video.

15. Sure Feels Like Rain

~ Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

I’m calling on you sunshine, shine down on me
I’m calling on you sunshine, help me see
The weather calls for sunshine, Just the same
Sure feels like rain

You tell me it’s all right, don’t think your lyin’
You tell me it’s all right, I think your tryin’
The weather calls for sunshine, just the same
Sure feels like rain

You tell me it’s all right, it don’t feel that way
You tell me it’ sall right, don’t’ matter what you say
The weather calls for sunshine, just the same
Sure feels like rain

I’m calling on you sunshine, shine down on me
I’m calling on your sunshine, set me free
The weather calls for sunshine, just the same
Sure feels like rain

The weather calls for sunshine, just the same
Sure feels like rain

from The Wages, track released 25 May 2010

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DSC7713-682x1030
Washboard Breezy
kidsinterviewbands_reverendpeyton
Peyton and fans

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